Can Anal Abscess be Treated without Surgery?

Can Anal Abscess be Treated without Surgery?

Anal abscesses rarely go away without treatment. The treatment of an abscess is surgical drainage under most circumstances. An incision is made in the skin near the anus to drain the infection. This can be done in a doctor’s office with local anesthetic or in an operating room under deeper anesthesia. Hospitalization may be required for patients prone to more significant infections, such as diabetics or patients with decreased immunity.
Antibiotics alone are a poor alternative to drainage of the infection. The routine addition of antibiotics to surgical drainage does not improve healing time or reduce the potential for recurrences in uncomplicated abscesses. There are some conditions in which antibiotics are indicated, such as patients with compromised or altered immunity or in the setting of extensive cellulitis (spreading of infection in the skin).
If there’s an extremely large anal abscess, surgery may be necessary. In some cases, a catheter may be used to make sure the abscess drains completely. Abscesses that have been drained are typically left open and don’t require any stitches.
Home remedies can help to prevent the recurrence of Anal Abscess, but complete treatment of anal abscess is not possible with them. Home remedies include:
• Sitz Bath to Treat Anal Abscess: Sitz bath or warm bath in which the buttocks are immersed in warm water that is brought up to the temperature of 40 degree centigrade. Adding Epsom salt, betadine and other antiseptic lotion to this water can also be a useful home remedy for anal abscess.
• Diet: If you are suffering from Anal Abscess, then it is important to avoid getting constipation. Diet should be supported with slippery elm tea, high fibrous food which helps in forming mucus that will assist in smooth bowel movement.
• Saturated coconut clarified butter, garlic and turmeric are extremely good home remedy as anti-inflammatory and can heal the pain that is caused by Anal Abscess.
References:
https://www.fascrs.org/patients/disease-condition/abscess-and-fistula-expanded-information
https://www.epainassist.com/pelvic-pain/what-can-cause-anal-abscess-and-how-is-it-treated
http://www.healthline.com/health/anorectal-abscess#diagnosis4

Leave a Comment

Name (required)
Email (required)
Comment (required)